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Research: Leisure Needs Survey

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Leisure Needs Survey 2005 Resource

2005 Report

2005 Briefing

Aberdeen Proving Ground

2005 Report

 

Anniston Army Depot

2005 Report

 

Ansbach

2005 Report


Fort A.P. Hill

2005 Report


Bamberg

2005 Report


Baumholder

2005 Report


Fort Belvoir

2005 Report


Fort Benning

2005 Report


Fort Bliss

2005 Report


Fort Bragg

2005 Report


Fort Buchanan

2005 Report


Area IV Busan

2005 Report

 

Fort Campbell

2005 Report


Carlisle Barracks

2005 Report

 

Fort Carson

2005 Report


Area II Colbern

2005 Report


Area IV Daegu

2005 Report


Darmstadt

2005 Report


Fort Detrick

2005 Report


Fort Dix

2005 Report


Area I Dongducheon

2005 Report


Fort Drum

2005 Report


Dugway Proving Ground

2005 Report


Fort Eustis

2005 Report


Fort Sam Houston

2005 Report


Giessen

2005 Report


Fort Gordon

2005 Report


Grafenwoehr

2005 Report


Fort Hamilton

2005 Report


Hanau

2005 Report


Heidelberg

2005 Report


Hohenfels

2005 Report


Fort Hood

2005 Report


Fort Huachuca

2005 Report


Area III Humphreys

2005 Report


Hunter Army Airfield

2005 Report


Fort Irwin

2005 Report


Fort Jackson

2005 Report


Kaiserslautern

2005 Report


Kitzingen

2005 Report


Fort Knox

2005 Report


Fort Lee

2005 Report


Fort Leonard Wood

2005 Report


Fort Lewis

2005 Report

 

Livorno

2005 Report

 

Mannheim

2005 Report

 

McAlester AAP

2005 Report


Fort McCoy

2005 Report


Fort McPherson

2005 Report


Fort Meade

2005 Report


Fort Monmouth

2005 Report


Fort Monroe

2005 Report


Fort Myer

2005 Report


Natick RDE Center

2005 Report


Picatinny Arsenal

2005 Report


Pine Bluff Arsenal

2005 Report


Fort Polk

2005 Report


Presidio of Monterey

2005 Report


Red River Army Depot

2005 Report


Redstone Arsenal

2005 Report


Fort Richardson

2005 Report


Fort Riley

2005 Report


Rock Island Arsenal

2005 Report


Fort Rucker

2005 Report


Schinnen

2005 Report


Schweinfurt

2005 Report


Selfridge

2005 Report


Shafter

2005 Report


SHAPE ASG

2005 Report

 

Sierra Army Depot

2005 Report


Fort Sill

2005 Report


Fort Stewart

2005 Report


Fort Story

2005 Report


Stuttgart

2005 Report


Tobyhanna Army Depot

2005 Report

 

Tooele Army Depot

2005 Report


Torii Station

2005 Report


Uijongbu East

2005 Report


Uijongbu West

2005 Report


USMA

2005 Report


Vicenza

2005 Report


Vilseck

2005 Report


Waegwan

2005 Report


Fort Wainwright

2005 Report


Walter Reed Army Medical Center

2005 Report


Watervliet Arsenal

2005 Report


White Sands Missile Range

2005 Report


Wiesbaden

2005 Report


Yongsan

2005 Report


Yuma

2005 Report


Zama

2005 Report

 

 

Using Your 2005 Leisure Needs Survey Report

The Triennial Needs Assessment Leisure Needs Survey, conducted at 92 Army installations in 2005, is intended to provide data to facilitate Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) program decisions at the installation, regional and Army-wide level. The report feeds into the five-year program planning process and can also be useful in daily operations planning and in marketing planning. Survey results give you a very general overview of your installation offerings and how they are perceived by your customers and are meant to point users in the appropriate direction to do additional research before making decisions. New to the 2005 LNS was the ability of respondents to fill out the survey via the internet.

 

It is very important to keep in mind several points when using your data. First, you should check the survey response rates for each of your patron groups. When you have low response rates to a survey effort, you have no way of identifying whether the people who responded to the survey are different from those that didn't respond and you cannot assume that they are the same. What this means is that while you DO have useful information about those that answered your survey, you cannot generalize the results to your overall population. Response rates, however, are not the only statistic you should consider when applying your data to your population. The confidence level represents the probability that the response to a

question would occur if 100 random samples were drawn from your population and asked the same question. This confidence level calculation is based on the actual number of surveys you had returned for each patron group, not the percentage of surveys returned. Thus, you should use both your response rates and your confidence levels to determine how accurately your samples represent your populations and if one or both is low, use caution in generalizing your survey results to your population. Further discussion of confidence levels can be found in your 2005 Leisure Needs Survey Report.

 

The 2005 Leisure Needs Survey Reports provide general levels of customer feedback about your programs and facilities and the data should be used as one indicator of what is happening in your market, but not as a sole decision-making tool. Many other pieces of information, whether qualitative or quantitative, such as focus groups, usage data, financial data, customer comment cards, competitive factors and Command guidance should be used in conjunction with survey results to adjust MWR programs and activities to meet the needs of the installation community.

 

Point of contact:

Mr. George Brezny, FMWRC Senior Marketing Research Specialist, 210-466-1866

Army Wide Triennial Needs Assessment 2000 Leisure Needs Survey

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
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